McLaren Port Huron – a leader in healing, your partner in health.

Getting Exercise

  1. Designing an Exercise Program

    To improve your heart and lung fitness, aim for 30 to 60 minutes of aerobic exercise three to four times a week.

  2. Exercise Goals for Healthy Living

    You know it's important to stay active but still find yourself falling back on old habits. What can you do? Planning for exercise isn't hard if you make it a priority.

  3. Exercise Your Way to a Healthy Heart

    Physical inactivity is just as big a risk factor for heart disease as high blood pressure and smoking are. So, be the exception rather than the rule. Here are eight ways to exercise for a healthier heart.

  4. Exercise: Before Starting an Exercise Program

    It is always important to talk with your doctor before starting an exercise program, particularly if you have certain health conditions.

  5. Give Your Health a Lift

    Weight lifting is one of the fastest-growing U.S. fitness activities. And the American Heart Association recently threw its weight behind weight lifting, too.

  6. How Much Exercise Is Enough?

    A private advisory group's call for 60 minutes of physical activity each day are in line with the 2005 USDA Guidelines for exercise of 30 to 60 minutes. The new advice was meant to get people moving, but some experts are worried about recommending 60 minutes.

  7. Maintain a Healthy Weight for a Lifetime

    Which is more important to you -- being able to wear the jeans you wore five years ago, or being able to move better, have more energy and improve your health?

  8. Preventing Cardiovascular Diseases

    Living a healthier lifestyle can help prevent heart disease. Don't smoke, eat a heart-healthy diet, and get regular exercise.

  9. Putting the 'Fun' Back Into Fitness

    Start thinking of fitness as fun. If it's something you want to do, then you'll figure out ways to find time for it.

  10. Risks of Physical Inactivity

    Lack of physical activity has clearly been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.